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The Mobilist
The future of batteries, electric cars, and driverless vehicles. A new blog from Medium.

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The stakes are so high that SK innovation will be forced to settle

The ID.4, VW’s answer to Tesla’s popular Model Y. Photo: Jens Schlueter/Getty

This is a story of cutthroat technological war, unfathomable corporate animus, a new kind of economic nationalism, and great power competition between the two most powerful leaders in the world. The likelihood is that the rare drama will end in a settlement that could lay low one of South Korea’s most powerful companies. But before then, it is a nerve-wracking spectacle that reflects the newfound tension rife in international batteries and electric cars.


EV charging, the Return of LFP, and the Lancia Fulvia

Envelopes of different sizes
Envelopes of different sizes
Photo: Joanna Kosinska/Unsplash

Each Wednesday, The Mobilist highlights reader articles on Medium, comments, and updates.


It’s standard economics — a product’s price usually rises to the level of its closest rival

Electric car charging station sign
Electric car charging station sign
Photo: Karol Serewis/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

In his confirmation hearing yesterday, Pete Buttigieg, the nominee to be transportation secretary, reiterated a promise that President Joe Biden made again and again on the campaign trail: The administration will seek funding to build a half-million electric vehicle (EV) chargers by 2030.


Tesla competitors are fighting the last war and missing the hot middle market

An aerial view of 16 blue cars on yellow background.
An aerial view of 16 blue cars on yellow background.
Image: Bernhard Lang/Stone/Getty

The coming two or three years will finally bring rich pickings for anyone interested in checking out an electric vehicle. If announced debuts go as planned, there will be the $75,000 Rivian R1T pickup, the $70,000 Jaguar E-Pace SUV, and the $66,000 Audi e-tron, not to mention the $77,000 Lucid Air and the $150,000 Porsche Taycan.


If the U.S. wants to win the electric car war, it needs to aggressively build out a charging network

A woman’s car being filled up at a petrol station in 1929.
A woman’s car being filled up at a petrol station in 1929.
Photo: Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Stringer/Getty Images

If you’re the average American, there is one thing you are generally unworried about: finding gasoline. You live within a mile or two of one or more of the country’s 115,000 gas stations. You sleep soundly knowing that as sure as the sun comes up in the morning, even if your car is empty, you can whip into your neighborhood 24-hour gas station, pump your 15 or so gallons in three or four minutes, and be good for the next 400 to 450 miles.


After decades of false starts, the moment has finally arrived

An illustrated collage with an electric vehicle, a battery, a charge symbol, a lightbulb, and more.
An illustrated collage with an electric vehicle, a battery, a charge symbol, a lightbulb, and more.
Illustration: James Marshall

Batteries incensed Thomas Edison, and not just batteries, but battery makers. In a much-quoted 1883 interview, Edison griped about his unsuccessful efforts to find a battery that would hold a charge long enough to be of practical use in an electric vehicle. For decades beyond — into the next century — Edison would continue his quest, but failed every time, and his friend Henry Ford ended up the winner, earning a fortune with his combustion-propelled Model T.

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