Sign in

The Mobilist
The future of batteries, electric cars, and driverless vehicles. A new blog from Medium.

Economics

In The Mobilist. More on Medium.

The automotive industry is on the verge of massive disruption. The decisions companies make today might determine their fate.

Photo by CHUTTERSNAP on Unsplash

In an industry as established as the automotive industry, it’s rare to see the industry leaders diverge as fundamentally as they are today. By vehicles sold, Toyota and the VW Group are the two largest automakers in the world. When it comes to the future of electric cars, the two companies have taken firmly opposed stances.

On one side, we have Volkswagen (VW) Group, which also owns Audi and Porsche. In the aftermath of their Diesel emissions scandal, VW Group has re-invented itself with the help of new Chairman Herbert Diess. Diess has taken an aggressive stance towards electric vehicles…


It’s standard economics — a product’s price usually rises to the level of its closest rival

Electric car charging station sign
Electric car charging station sign
Photo: Karol Serewis/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

In his confirmation hearing yesterday, Pete Buttigieg, the nominee to be transportation secretary, reiterated a promise that President Joe Biden made again and again on the campaign trail: The administration will seek funding to build a half-million electric vehicle (EV) chargers by 2030.

But if forecasts for EV demand are borne out, the U.S. will need a lot more charging points. In a report earlier this month, McKinsey puts the required number at five to nine million by 2025 and double or triple those figures by 2030. …

The Mobilist

The future of batteries, electric cars, and driverless vehicles. A new blog from Medium.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store